Red Panda conservation in China

Red pandas (or lesser pandas) have long, fluffy striped tails like a raccoon, and faces and diets that resemble a giant panda’s, but they clean themselves like a cat. However, they are not raccoons, bears, or cats — they were until recently thought to be the only living species in a genus of their own (Ailuridae). However in recent years, scientists have determined that ther are actually two separate species – the Himalayan Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) and the Chinese Red Panda (Ailurus styani). Conservation:The Red Panda is a National Second-class Protected Species in China—with both hunting and trade prohibited.It is also listed in Appendix I of the … Continue reading Red Panda conservation in China

China to have unified electricity market system by 2025

China aims to initially build a unified electricity market system by 2025 to enable optimized power resource allocation in a wider scope and improve the stability and flexibility of the power system, according to guidelines released Friday (2022-01-28) “Efforts will be made to enhance the adaptability of the electricity market to a high proportion of new energy sources, and for the creation of innovate mechanisms to carry out green power trading pilot projects.” Under the system, the national market and provincial, regional markets will operate collaboratively, with significant improvements in cross-provincial and cross-regional market allocation of resources and green power … Continue reading China to have unified electricity market system by 2025

COVID-19 may have reached Europe as early as 2019: Norwegian study

[See CGTN: http://www.ecns.cn/…/2022…/detail-ihavfwhh0343767.shtml] New findings by Norwegian researchers show that the novel coronavirus could have arrived in Europe a month earlier than previously thought. This adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting the coronavirus was spreading globally before the first … Continue reading COVID-19 may have reached Europe as early as 2019: Norwegian study

Glacier retreat accelerates global chemical weathering

Chinese and foreign researchers have evaluated the global chemical weathering rates beneath glaciers for the first time, revealing temporal and spatial variations and influence mechanisms. Chemical weathering, also known as decomposition or decay, is the breakdown of rock by chemical mechanisms, and it usually changes the chemical composition of the rock through carbonation, hydration, hydrolysis or oxidation. Researchers from China’s Northwest University, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Pennsylvania State University collected the cation concentration data of 5,465 runoff samples from 77 glaciers worldwide and assessed the cation denudation rates (CDRs) of 10 global glacier regions and the Arctic and … Continue reading Glacier retreat accelerates global chemical weathering